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Emergency Preparedness Month – Sep 20

Handouts: Be Prepared for an Active Shooter; Free DHSCISA Active Shooter Webinar

Good Monday morning everyone,

So far this month we have been reviewing natural disasters.  There are other hazard situations that we also need to prepare for, for example, an active shooter.  Below are some FBI statistics on active shooter events over the past 20 years and a link to a video on how to survive an active shooter event.  I have also attached an email for an Active Shooter webinar that is open to the public and free. The class fills up quickly so register soon if you are interested. 

Tina Arthur, CHMM
Environmental, Safety, Health, & Security Manager
Hager Companies

(Follow this link to next post.)

Emergency Preparedness Month – Sept 13

As we continue our information on Emergency Preparedness, today we look at how to prepare for a hurricane.

Hurricane Ida just struck Louisiana a few days ago.  Residents there are still feeling the effects. 

**Note:  this information can be found on www.ready.gov.

Tina Arthur, CHMM
Environmental, Safety, Health, & Security Manager
Hager Companies

(Follow link to the next post.)

Emergency Preparedness Month – Sept 10

3.  Take Action

There are many simple actions that you can take now to prepare yourself and your property for a disaster.  For example, you should regularly practice your disaster plan with your family and reveiw and understand your insurance coverage.  Here are some other preparedness actions you and your family can take.

 *   Keep Informed, Alerts and Warnings:  There are many alert and warning systems to keep you and your family up-to-date while at work, home, school, or away.  Learn which ones are available in areas you spend a lot of time and subscribe to them.  Once you have signed up, officials in your area can send you text messages about local emergencies. Some may have mobile apps to ensure that you can receive the information when disasters happen.  Workplaces, schools, and community-based or faith-based groups may have their own similar opt-in notification systems. The FEMA app offers notifications with information on local threats.  Double check that your mobile devices can get Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs).  Make a list of all the alert systems available to you, and make sure everyone in your household gets the alerts as part of your household communication plan.

 *   Know Your Insurance Options and Document Your Property:  Understanding your insurance needs is an important step to prepare yourself and your family for a disaster.  Getting the right type and amount of insurance can mean the difference between a quick recovery from disaster and years of financial challenges.  Attached is a brochure to help you assess your current insurance needs. The insurance industry identifies a cause of loss, such as fire or theft, as a “peril.”  Insurance only applies when your policy covers the peril that caused the loss.  Be sure to check your policy to see which perils it covers, and in what situations.

**Note:  this information can be found on www.ready.gov.

Tina Arthur, CHMM
Environmental, Safety, Health, & Security Manager
Hager Companies

(Follow this link to the next post.)

Emergency Preparedness Month – Sept 9

Prepare Your Critical Documents

It is important to find and gather your valuables and information that will help you recover quickly and effectively after a disaster.  Collect these documents and make a list of your household belongings and valuables.  This is a critical step because you may need this inventory list for insurance records.

Once you put together your financial, legal, and contact information, it is important to protect it.  Keep paper copies of these documents at home in a fire- and waterproof box or safe, in a bank safe deposit box, or with a person you trust.  Keep electronic copies of these documents in a password protected, encrypted format on a removable flash or external hard drive in your fire- and waterproof box or safe, or use a secure cloud-based service.

Attached are checklists and additional information to help prepare your critical documents.

**Note:  this information can be found on www.ready.gov.

Tina Arthur, CHMM
Environmental, Safety, Health, & Security Manager
Hager Companies

(Follow this link to the next post.)

Emergency Preparedness Month – Sept 8

Gathering emergency supplies for an emergency supply kit is a essential component to disaster preparedness.  You should store emergency supplies in different places, such as your home, office, and vehicle. Your basic emergency supply kit should include the following:

  • Water: Keep one gallon of drinking water, per person, per day in your kit.
  • Food:  Keep as much non-perishable food, like can and dry goods, as your family will need to survive a major disaster.
  • Cash:  Keep enough cash on hand to buy food, fuel, and a few nights in a hotel in case you need to evacuate.
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA All Hazards-Weather Radio with tone alert – keep extra batteries for both.
  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • First aid kit.
  • Whistle.
  • N95 Respirator masks.  They are light and small, but may keep you safe from smoke and chemicals.
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities.
  • Can opener or other food preparation tools.
  • Local maps.

Tina Arthur, CHMM
Environmental, Safety, Health, & Security Manager
Hager Companies

(Follow this link to the next post.)